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Global Payroll to Population Employment Rate at 27% for 2011

September 6th, 2012 |

The following information was unveiled by Gallop Inc. on Sept. 5th, 2012. Gallop has created a new picture of global employment, which uses total global population in the 15+ age bracket (not just the number currently in the known workforce) as the basis for understanding employment percentages.

Global Payroll to Population Employment Rate at 27% for 2011

Sub-Saharan Africa trails other regions, Northern America leads

See: http://www.gallup.com/poll/156944/global-employment-p2p-wednesday-story.aspx#1

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Twenty-seven percent of the world’s adults were employed full time for an employer in 2011, according to Gallup’s new “Payroll to Population” metric. This new measure estimates the percentage of the entire 15 and older population — not just those currently in the workforce — who are employed full time for an employer for at least 30 hours per week. Worldwide, the Payroll to Population percentage was highest in Northern America, at 41%, and lowest in sub-Saharan Africa, at 12%.

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Adults who are self-employed, working part time, unemployed, or out of the workforce are not counted as payroll-employed in the Payroll to Population metric. Gallup finds this new measure of employment to be more strongly related to GDP per capita than any other employment metric, including unemployment, which is traditionally the gold standard employment measure but relates little to GDP.

Payroll to Population provides a more accurate picture of the true economic situation in a country because it is not affected by changes in the workforce participation rate. When jobs are scarce, people may drop out of the workforce. This can actually lead to an improvement in unemployment rates, even though fewer people are working. Payroll to Population, on the other hand, declines when fewer people are working and rises when more people find full-time work.

Payroll to Population Lower in Developing Countries

Sweden, Belarus, and Israel had the highest Payroll to Population employment rates in the world in 2011 and were the only countries where the percentage was 50% or higher. Overall, 19 countries had a Payroll to Population percentage that was 40% or higher. Most of the countries at the top of the list had a large percentage of adults employed in the services sector, which includes government jobs.

To read the full article, please click here: http://www.gallup.com/poll/156944/global-employment-p2p-wednesday-story.aspx#1

 

Comments

One Response to “Global Payroll to Population Employment Rate at 27% for 2011”

  1. GS RADJOU Says:

    Do they have payroll (What is their employment metric)
    Victory of indigenous people of Amazon:
    Human rights for indignous is a worldwide and a global concerns, when they are facing modern development and their thirst for energy security. I want you to join me on the other side of the Pacific and crossing the Andes to find out the Amazon and indigenous people-the xingu people from Amazon are much closer to Atlantic Ocean-however there last court battle against against dam builders has looked to me relevant to the International Labor Organization (ILO) Convention 169 protective of indigenous people. I can say yet if Brazil has denounced the convention -it looks the country has, in this case it would no be effective yet as the American court judge stopped the dam building licencing because indians were not consulted (as it is stipulated in ILO Convention 169)

    Ref.:
    1- Victory of indigenous people of Amazon
    http://amazonwatch.org/news/2012/0903-federal-public-prosecutors-appeal-to-supreme-court-to-maintain-suspension-of-belo-monte
    2- On the ILO Convention 169
    http://www.ilo.org/indigenous/Conventions/no169/lang–en/index.htm

    To me now the best indigenous laws are to be found in Australia (because there are attempts to rejuvenate these indigenous laws and making them living beings and side by side with modern australian laws (Is not it what is called integration- If any body can answer me?)

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