Facebook Twitter



Articles by Category for ‘Population’

The rates of child births in Uganda should be of major concern

Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

The rates of child births in Uganda should be of major concern 

See: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/660320-the-rates-of-child-births-in-uganda-should-be-of-major-conce.html

At this year’s International Community of the Banyakigenzi Convention (ICOB), held August 2014, from Washington DC, I was one of the guest speakers.

I presented a paper titled “the impact of high population growth on youth entrepreneurship in Uganda.”

 
I elaborated the socioeconomic imperatives of Uganda’s high population growth rates and called on the Government to urgently promote family planning services nationwide.

 
My presentation was met with checks and balances by some high ranking politicians that included Hon. General Jim Muhwezi Katugugu, who echoed that he considered Uganda to be underpopulated.

 
The General Muhwezi reiterated that Uganda’s geographical size was almost the same size as that of United Kingdom, which has a population of 64.1 million, nearly twice (36.9 million) that of Uganda.

 

Indeed, I implored UK’s population density to be 264 compared Uganda’s 153 people per square kilometer, which shows Uganda to be less densely populated than UK.

 
This far, I agree with Muhwezi, who in addition, challenged the ICOB audience never to lose sight of the progress the current leadership has brought to Uganda over the last 30 years.

 
However, comparing Uganda with United Kingdom presents to us the popular puzzle of likening apples with oranges. Uganda’s Gross National Income (GNI) per capita per person is $1,140 whereas Britain’s is thirty times ($35,800) more.

See: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/660320-the-rates-of-child-births-in-uganda-should-be-of-major-conce.html

Contraception: Saving Lives… and the Planet

Friday, September 26th, 2014

Contraception: Saving Lives… and the Planet 

See: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/robert-walker/contraception-saving-live_b_5884600.html

 

On Friday, September 26, the world is celebrating World Contraception Day. Okay, ‘celebrating’ may be too strong a word. ‘Observing’ may be more like it. And the number of people actually observing the day in some form is probably small. Okay, very small. To borrow a phrase from Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, the world “will little note, nor long remember” World Contraception Day 2014. That’s too bad. For in truth, there’s a whole lot to celebrate, and a whole lot more left to do if men and women everywhere are going to have access to the contraceptive method of their choice.

The obvious reason for celebrating modern contraceptives is that they allow us to have children by choice, rather than by chance. They minimize, in other words, the chances of an unintended or unwanted pregnancy. That mere fact itself is worth a celebratory cheer, but there is a lot more to get excited about.

Contraception is a life-saver.

Contraception saves lives
, particularly in developing nations where access to contraception can mean the difference between life and death for girls and women who do not have access to adequate medical care. This is particularly true for child brides who are not physically mature enough to give birth, but pregnancy is a significant health risk for women of any age who are unable to space their pregnancies more than 18 months apart.

In the United States, very few women die from pregnancy-related causes, but in some rural parts of Africa, women have a 1 in 30 lifetime chance of dying as a result of a pregnancy. Of the 800 women in the world who die every day from pregnancy-related causes, the vast majority are in the developing world.

Continue Reading »

In Texas & Around The World: Women’s Rights Matter for The Environment

Friday, September 26th, 2014

Why Women’s Rights Matter for The Environment

See: http://www.tribtalk.org/2014/09/16/why-womens-rights-matter-for-the-environment/

Texas women have suffered major setbacks to their reproductive health and rights this year.

 

At the federal level, the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision has made it more difficult for women to access their contraceptive method of choice. At the state level, the Legislature and Gov. Rick Perry have enacted new restrictions on clinics providing basic women’s health care and family planning services.

 
Of course, these decisions hurt Texas women and their families – but they also increase the risk of social, economic and environmental harm in our great state.

 
When women and their medical providers are prevented from making personal health care decisions, the negative consequences are far-reaching. A woman’s inability to control the number, timing and spacing of her children impacts her health, education and career. Moreover, the cumulative impact of women having more children than they desire strains public health systems and natural resources such as water, energy and healthy food.

Continue Reading »

New Study Finds that 40% of Pregnancies Worldwide are Unintended

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

NEW STUDY FINDS THAT 40% OF PREGNANCIES WORLDWIDE ARE UNINTENDED

Findings Highlight Need for Increased Investment in Contraceptive Services
See: http://www.guttmacher.org/media/nr/2014/09/17/sfp-sedgh-up.html
Of the 213 million pregnancies that occurred worldwide in 2012, 40%-about 85 million-were unintended, about the same proportion as in 2008, when 42% of all pregnancies globally were unintended. The new study, “Intended and Unintended Pregnancies Worldwide in 2012 and Recent Trends,” by Gilda Sedgh et al. of the Guttmacher Institute, found that the proportion of pregnancies that are unintended varied considerably by region. The highest proportions were in Latin America and the Caribbean (56%) and North America (51%), and the lowest were in Africa (35%), Oceania (37%) and Asia (38%); Europe’s proportion was the closest to the global average (45%).

 
In addition to documenting the proportions of pregnancies that are unintended across regions, the study examined recent trends in unintended pregnancy rates per 1,000 women of reproductive age. The researchers found that the average annual decline in the global unintended pregnancy rate between 2008 and 2012 was very small, compared with the average annual decline between 1995 and 2008. In 2012, there were 53 unintended pregnancies per 1,000 women aged 15-44, compared with 57 in 2008.

 
Overall, between 2008 and 2012, the unintended pregnancy rate remained steady in developed regions-44, on average-but it remained higher than average in North America (51). In less developed regions, it declined from 59 to 54; most of this decline resulted from declines in the Latin American and Caribbean region (76 to 68) and in Africa (86 to 80). There was less of a decline in Asia, where the rate (46) was more comparable to that in Europe (43) and in Oceania (43).

 

See: http://www.guttmacher.org/media/nr/2014/09/17/sfp-sedgh-up.html

World population to hit 11bn in 2100 – with 70% chance of continuous rise

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

World population to hit 11bn in 2100 – with 70% chance of continuous rise

New study overturns 20 years of consensus on peak projection of 9bn and gradual decline

See: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/sep/18/world-population-new-study-11bn-2100

 
The world’s population is now odds-on to swell ever-higher for the rest of the century, posing grave challenges for food supplies, healthcare and social cohesion. A ground-breaking analysis releasedon Thursday shows there is a 70% chance that the number of people on the planet will rise continuously from 7bn today to 11bn in 2100.

 
The work overturns 20 years of consensus that global population, and the stresses it brings, will peak by 2050 at about 9bn people.

 
“The previous projections said this problem was going to go away so it took the focus off the population issue,” said Prof Adrian Raftery, at the University of Washington, who led the international research team. “There is now a strong argument that population should return to the top of the international agenda. Population is the driver of just about everything else and rapid population growth can exacerbate all kinds of challenges.” Lack of healthcare, poverty, pollution and rising unrest and crime are all problems linked to booming populations, he said.

 
“Population policy has been abandoned in recent decades. It is barely mentioned in discussions on sustainability or development such as the UN-led sustainable development goals,” said Simon Ross, chief executive of Population Matters, a thinktank supported by naturalist Sir David Attenborough and scientist James Lovelock. “The significance of the new work is that it provides greater certainty. Specifically, it is highly likely that, given current policies, the world population will be between 40-75% larger than today in the lifetime of many of today’s children and will still be growing at that point,” Ross said.

See: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/sep/18/world-population-new-study-11bn-2100

Hey, U.N.: Climate change and population are related

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

Hey, U.N.: Climate change and population are related 

See: http://grist.org/climate-energy/hey-u-n-climate-change-and-population-are-related/
On Sept. 22 and 23, the United Nations will host separate daylong conferences on two issues of incalculable importance to the future of humanity: population andclimate change. Though the two meetings will take place just one day apart, neither is likely to refer to the other. And that will be a missed opportunity, because scientific research increasingly affirms that the two issues are linked in many ways.

 
The population gathering in the General Assembly on Sept. 22 will mark the 20th anniversary of the landmark International Conference on Population and Development held in Cairo in 1994. The next day’s summit has been convened by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon for government and business leaders to brainstorm ideas for addressing climate change.

 
The coincidence of these meetings occurring a day apart offers a teachable moment for the global decision-makers gathering in New York. Actions to promote the well-being of women might produce mutually reinforcing benefits in both areas.

 
Population, the lives and status of women, and climate change are rarely linked at the United Nations – or in any other intergovernmental conversations, for that matter. Intuitively, it’s easy to understand that the growth of world population from 1 billion people at the start of the Industrial Revolution to 7.3 billion today has something to do with the accumulation of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

See: http://grist.org/climate-energy/hey-u-n-climate-change-and-population-are-related/

Rapid UK population growth undermines living standards, but may be necessary for economic growth

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

Rapid UK population growth undermines living standards, but may be necessary for economic growth 

See: http://phys.org/news/2014-09-rapid-uk-population-growth-undermines.html

 

The traditional link between population growth and economic growth has been weakened in the UK, according to academics at the Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute (SPERI).

 

The latest evidence shows that despite the economic recession of the late 2000s, and subsequent stagnation, the UK population has grown at a rapid rate since the mid-2000s, with this growth continuing despite the coalition government’s attempts to curb immigration.

 
This contrasts with post-war experience in the UK, say academics. High population growth in the mid-to-late 1960s was matched by high economic growth, and lower population growth in the 1970s was matched by lower economic growth. Similarly, higher population growth from the mid-1980s onwards was matched by relatively high economic growth (with the exception of the early 1990s recession).

 
This unusual shift is the main reason that, while the economy creeps towards recovery in statistical terms, living standards remain significantly below their pre-recession peak.

See: http://phys.org/news/2014-09-rapid-uk-population-growth-undermines.html

Climate Change and World Population: Still Avoiding Each Other

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

Climate Change and World Population: Still Avoiding Each Other 

See: http://passblue.com/2014/09/16/climate-change-and-world-population-still-avoiding-each-other/
Despite their intimate relationship, climate change and world population are still not talking to each other. The lack of meaningful dialogue has persisted for decades, with both seeming to deliberately ignore the significance, relevance and impact of the other.

 
With the simultaneous convening on Sept. 22 of a special session of the United Nations General Assembly marking the 20th anniversary of the International Conference on Population and Development and the UN Climate Summit on Sept. 23, this estranged relationship is now more glaring. Both gatherings are taking place within shouting distance of one another at UN headquarters in New York.

 
With growing concerns and uncertainties about the extent of the detrimental consequences of rapid population growth and climate change, the international community of nations convened the first World Population Conference in 1974 and the first World Climate Conference in 1979. Growing at 2 percent annually, global population increases reached a record high, doubling the world population in just 38 years. At the same time, rising amounts of carbon dioxide spewing into the atmosphere pointed to a gradual warming of the earth, especially at higher latitudes. The recommendations for action emanating from these groundbreaking conferences, however, essentially ignored each other.

See: http://passblue.com/2014/09/16/climate-change-and-world-population-still-avoiding-each-other/

Video: The Eighth Billion

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

The Eighth Billion

See: http://vimeo.com/102369639

Technology, rising material consumption, and what could be called a pandemic of “nature deficit disorders” are causing the loss of large areas of wilderness and ecosystem services, but the greatest threat can be traced to growing numbers of people.

The exponential nature of population growth shapes life on earth almost as much as gravity or respiration. But because it is so pervasive, it often goes unseen. One hour from now, earth will show a net increase of more than 9,000 humans, each one needing adequate food, water, shelter, clothing, education, and eventually jobs, not to mention realistic dreams of a better life for themselves and for their children… and on it goes. Our population currently adds 219,000 people every day. That’s a billion every 12-13 years. Will the next billion drive human civilization to a social and ecological tipping point?

“The Eighth Billion” examines the impact of population growth on the health of wildlife and wild places. It also explores the benefits of wildness and natural beauty for producing human enjoyment and inspiration. Wilderness is a form of ecological wealth that, unlike money, is not ours to spend. The quality of our lives and that of future generations depends on efforts to preserve this wealth.

Population stabilization and wilderness preservation offer complementary pathways to true prosperity. As imperatives of sustainability, they offer the prospect of a world that is green, prosperous, inspirational, and fair. If we can embrace both pathways, we just might create a world that is worth inheriting!

Population, not politics, threatens Pakistan

Monday, September 15th, 2014

Population, not politics, threatens Pakistan 

See: http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/67778df6-38ec-11e4-a53b-00144feabdc0.html#axzz3CwnJ1R31

While the politicians fight each other in Islamabad for control of Pakistan, they make no mention in their fiery speeches of the real crisis likely to stunt prosperity for generations. According to economists and demographers, the explosion that endangers Pakistan is not political but demographic.

 
At independence in 1947, there were 33m Pakistanis. Today there are about 200m, making the nation the sixth most populous in the world. By 2050, the population will reach 302m, if the standard projection of the Population Council, a non-government group based in New York, proves correct.

 
However, the number of inhabitants in 2050 could be as high as 395m or as low as 266m, depending on whether the fertility rate remains stable or declines rapidly from the current level of 3.8 children per woman. The gap between the highest and lowest forecasts is huge, exceeding the population of most countries.

 
The strain on natural resources (especially water), government services, infrastructure and families is already immense and will worsen – even if Islamabad suddenly boosts family-planning programmes to meet popular demand for contraception and so ensures the population grows at the lowest of the predicted rates.

See: http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/67778df6-38ec-11e4-a53b-00144feabdc0.html#axzz3CwnJ1R31