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PMC Articles Tagged 'Nigeria'

Nigeria Tested by Rapid Rise in Population

April 16th, 2012 by joe | Add a Comment

Bill Ryerson, currently in Nigeria working to plan a PMC program there, sent me the link to this highly relevant story. At roughly 170 million (currently) in its population size, Nigeria now accounts for about 2.4% of global population. See: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/15/world/africa/in-nigeria-a-preview-of-an-overcrowded-planet.html?_r=2&ref=todayspaper

Nigeria Tested by Rapid Rise in Population

By ELISABETH ROSENTHAL Published: April 14, 2012

LAGOS, Nigeria – In a quarter-century, at the rate Nigeria is growing, 300 million people – a population about as big as that of the present-day United States – will live in a country the size of Arizona and New Mexico. In this commercial hub, where the area’s population has by some estimates nearly doubled over 15 years to 21 million, living standards for many are falling.

Lifelong residents like Peju Taofika and her three granddaughters inhabit a room in a typical apartment block known as a “Face Me, Face You” because whole families squeeze into 7-by-11-foot rooms along a narrow corridor. Up to 50 people share a kitchen, toilet and sink – though the pipes in the neighborhood often no longer carry water.

At Alapere Primary School, more than 100 students cram into most classrooms, two to a desk.

As graduates pour out of high schools and universities, Nigeria’s unemployment rate is nearly 50 percent for people in urban areas ages 15 to 24 – driving crime and discontent.

The growing upper-middle class also feels the squeeze, as commutes from even nearby suburbs can run two to three hours.

Last October, the United Nations announced the global population had breached seven billion and would expand rapidly for decades, taxing natural resources if countries cannot better manage the growth.

Nearly all of the increase is in sub-Saharan Africa, where the population rise far outstrips economic expansion. Of the roughly 20 countries where women average more than five children, almost all are in the region.

Elsewhere in the developing world, in Asia and Latin America, fertility rates have fallen sharply in recent generations and now resemble those in the United States – just above two children per woman. That transformation was driven in each country by a mix of educational and employment opportunities for women, access to contraception, urbanization and an evolving middle class. Whether similar forces will defuse the population bomb in sub-Sarahan Africa is unclear.

“The pace of growth in Africa is unlike anything else ever in history and a critical problem,” said Joel E. Cohen, a professor of population at Rockefeller University in New York City. “What is effective in the context of these countries may not be what worked in Latin America or Kerala or Bangladesh.”

Across sub-Saharan Africa, alarmed governments have begun to act, often reversing longstanding policies that encouraged or accepted large families. Nigeria made contraceptives free last year, and officials are promoting smaller families as a key to economic salvation, holding up the financial gains in nations like Thailand as inspiration.

Nigeria, already the world’s sixth most populous nation with 167 million people, is a crucial test case, since its success or failure at bringing down birthrates will have outsize influence on the world’s population. If this large nation rich with oil cannot control its growth, what hope is there for the many smaller, poorer countries?

“Population is key,” said Peter Ogunjuyigbe, a demographer at Obafemi Awolowo University in the small central city of Ile-Ife. “If you don’t take care of population, schools can’t cope, hospitals can’t cope, there’s not enough housing – there’s nothing you can do to have economic development.”

To read the full article, please click here: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/15/world/africa/in-nigeria-a-preview-of-an-overcrowded-planet.html?_r=2&ref=todayspaper

Does female schooling reduce fertility? Evidence from Nigeria

October 14th, 2008 by Chantelle Routhier | 1 Comment

The literature generally points to a negative relationship between female education and fertility. Citing this pattern, policymakers have advocated educating girls and young women as a means to reduce population growth and foster sustained economic and social welfare in developing countries. This paper tests whether the relationship between fertility and education is indeed causal by investigating the introduction of universal primary education in Nigeria. Exploiting differences in program exposure by region and age, the paper presents reduced form and instrumental variables estimates of the impact of female education on fertility. The analysis suggests that increasing female education by one year reduces early fertility by 0.26 births.

For full article, visit:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science

Gugar Goge (“Tell It To Me Straight”) Featured in Soul Beat

October 8th, 2008 by Chantelle Routhier | Add a Comment

Participatory Assessment of Gugar Goge, an Entertainment-Education Radio Soap Opera in Nigeria – A Qualitative Assessment Report

by Arvind Singhal, Sarah Hurlburt and Radha Vij

This report documents the results of a participatory assessment exercise conducted in Nigeria to gauge audience reception of Gugar Goge (“Tell It To Me Straight”), an entertainment-education radio soap opera produced by Population Media Center that sought to promote education for girls, the delay of marriage and pregnancies, and the adoption of family planning and maternal health services to both prevent and treat obstetric fistula. The assessment exercise, which used participatory sketching and participatory photography, aimed to assess how frequent listeners engaged with the radio programme, and how they derived personal meanings from its plot, characters, and educational messages.

For full article, visit:http://www.comminit.com/en/node/269041/38

Ruwan Dare (“Midnight Rain”) Featured in Soul Beat

October 8th, 2008 by Chantelle Routhier | Add a Comment

Launched in July 2007, this is a 2-year radio serial drama being produced by Population Media Center (PMC) in Nigeria. Through character role-models, the drama aims to enhance knowledge and use of existing health services, provide information about reproductive and general health issues, encourage family planning, and promote delaying marriage and childbearing until adulthood. It also aims to promote small family norms, provide information about HIV transmission, and motivate people to take actions to improve their health and the health of their families.

One of the storylines is about Azumi, who is pregnant while breastfeeding her four-month-old son. Azumi becomes very sick and nearly dies during the delivery of her son. The couple’s story explores the need for birth spacing and contraception in the context of cultural and social demands to have many children quickly.

For full article, visit:
http://www.comminit.com/en/node/269771/38

Holtz Report Covers PMC in Nigeria

July 15th, 2008 by Chantelle Routhier | Add a Comment

Andrew Holtz has done a nice article covering PMC’s work in Nigeria.

Dateline Nigeria (PDF, 130KB)

PMC Featured in Soul Beat

June 12th, 2008 by Chantelle Routhier | Add a Comment

Participatory Assessment of Gugar Goge, an Entertainment-Education: A Qualitative Assessment Report
by Arvind Singhal, Sarah Hurlburt, and Radha Vij

This report documents the results of a participatory assessment exercise conducted in Nigeria to gauge audience reception of Gugar Goge (“Tell It To Me Straight”), an entertainment-education radio soap opera that sought to promote education for girls, the delay of marriage and pregnancies, and the adoption of family planning and maternal health services. The assessment exercise, which used participatory sketching and participatory photography, aimed to assess how frequent listeners engaged with the radio programme, and how they derived personal meanings from its plot, characters, and educational messages.

For full article, visit:
http://www.comminit.com/en/node/269041/304

Ruwan Dare (Midnight Rain) on Soul Beat Website

May 17th, 2008 by Chantelle Routhier | Add a Comment

Soul Beat Africa is carrying a story on PMC’s Nigeria program, Ruwan Dare (Midnight Rain).

The article can be viewed at http://www.comminit.com/en/node/269771.

A Global Need for Grain That Farms Can’t Fill

April 25th, 2008 by Chantelle Routhier | Comments Off

Whatever Dennis Miller decides to plant this year on his 2,760-acre farm, the world needs. Wheat prices have doubled in the last six months. Corn is on a tear. Barley, sunflower seeds, canola and soybeans are all up sharply.

“For once, there’s great reason to be optimistic,” Mr. Miller said.

But the prices that have renewed Mr. Miller’s faith in farming are causing pain far and wide. A tailor in Lagos, Nigeria, named Abel Ojuku said recently that he had been forced to cut back on the bread he and his family love.

For full article, visit:
http://www.nytimes.com

Nigeria Program Report on Soul Beat Africa Website

April 19th, 2008 by Chantelle Routhier | Comments Off

Soul Beat Africa has a summary of the study, “Participatory Assessment of Gugar Goge, an Entertainment-Education, A Radio Soap Opera in Nigeria: Qualitative Assessment Report” in the evaluations section of their website, at:
http://www.comminit.com/en/node/269041.

Soul Beat Africa has a story about PMC’s work in Nigeria

December 2nd, 2007 by Chantelle Routhier | Add a Comment

Soul Beat Africa has a story about PMC’s work in Nigeria at:

http://www.comminit.com/en/node/134360