Lou Dobbs on Overpopulation and Climate Change

September 24, 2009 • Daily Email Recap

Thanks to Diana Hull and congratulations to Ben Zuckerman for this piece by Lou Dobbs on the overpopulation and climate change.

You can view the piece on YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nynmAw4MaU

Thanks to John Tanton for sending the transcript of the show.

LOU DOBBS TONIGHT
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Aired September 21, 2009 – 19:00 ET
THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.
DOBBS: Coming up next, forget recycling and hybrid cars, why having fewer children may save the environment, may save the planet. But nobody’s talking about that. Why? We’ll be right back.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

DOBBS: We have more tonight on a story that we first brought to you last month. There is new evidence of the negative impact of overpopulation on our environment. The biggest threat to the environment isn’t, it turns out, gas-guzzling cars or power plants but rather having too many children all around the world. Casey Wian with our report.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

CASEY WIAN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: The cheapest way to stop global climate change is not converting to solar power or buying a hybrid car. It’s putting on a condom. That’s the conclusion of a London school of economics study showing that money spent on contraception is about five times more efficient than money spent on clean energy technologies. It backs up a recent Oregon State University study that concludes overpopulation is the single biggest threat to the environment.

PROF. PAUL MURTAUGH, OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY: It’s been a lot of attention to the effects of individuals’ lifestyle choices, things like transportation, food choices and so on, but relatively little attention to the effect of having children.

WIAN: The British Medical Journal and Lancet last week both published an editorial stating that the sensitive issue of population stabilization continues to slip off the agenda but is crucial to achieving real reductions in global co2 emissions.

VICKY MARKHAM, DIR. CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENT AND POPULATION: There is a large body of scientific evidence that shows links between population factors and climate change as well as many other environmental issues but climate change is especially.

WIAN: Supporters of the idea are not advocating laws that would restrict individual family planning choices or encourage government funding with birth control. They want developed and developing nations to at least discuss the issue. Rapidly rising population is a greater threat in third world nations while the environmental impact of each child in developmental countries is greater because they use much more energy.

PROF. BEN ZUCKERMAN, UCLA: People should be made aware of both by the environmental organizations and by the media that it’s good for a couple to stop at two or fewer non-adopted children and then to outline some of the good environmental things that would accrue.

WIAN: Yet, many environmental groups are reluctant to tacking the issue, so is the United Nations, which is overseeing global change negotiations. “The Washington Post” reports it asked a U.N. official about family planning and the environment and the official replied “to bring the issue up would be an insult to developing countries.”

(END VIDEOTAPE)

WIAN: President Obama plans to speak at the U.N. tomorrow about climate change, in advance of I global conference on the issue in December. Scholars who are concerned about the rural overpopulation plays in climate change are still hope forge a seat at the table during those talks. Lou?

DOBBS: Yeah, I mean what we’re really talking about here is, you can almost hear the shudders of politically correct quarters all over the country as you report on that as we bring that knowledge to the American public. Because there’s such high-bound orthodoxies in this country, ideological, partisan, politically correct constraints on lines in this country. That’s the real problem here, isn’t it?

WIAN: Absolutely. The scholars we talked to say it’s been absolutely ignored by the environmental community, Lou.

DOBBS: All right. Thank you very much, Casey. As always, we’re awfully sensitive to those orthodoxies there. Thanks very much, Casey Wian.

And a reminder to join me on the radio Monday through Fridays for the Lou Dobbs Show, 2:00 to 4:00 each afternoon on WOR radio in New York. And go to loudobbs.com to sign up for our podcast.

Thanks for being with us.


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