Population Media Center Announces Results in Mali

August 4, 2010 • Family Planning, HIV/AIDS, Reproductive Health, Serial Dramas, Radio Serial Dramas, Mali, Daily Email Recap

The West African country of Mali has among the highest fertility rates in the world (6.6, according to the 2006 Demographic and Health Survey). The DHS showed that only 6.9% of married women currently use modern methods of contraception. The top reasons for non-use included: personal opposition to family planning (22.1%), wanting as many children as possible (17.6%), male opposition (9.0%), and not knowing a method (8.6%). Among non-users, 33.7% say they intend to use contraception in the future, while 54.5% do not.

To address these issues, PMC broadcast a radio serial drama, Jigi ma Tignè (“Hope Is Allowed”), from March to September 2009. The 74-episode drama was heard nationally on eight regional stations of the national radio network and 50 local community radio stations. The project was carried out with support from the Wallace Global Fund, the Jewish Communal Fund, the Conservation, Food and Health Foundation, USAID/Mali, and an individual donor. USAID’s support was intended to also promote reducing stigma and discrimination against people with disabilities. Following is the data from the endline survey. Mike Desarno of the University of Vermont Statistics Department conducted a logistic regression analysis to identify significant differences between listeners and non-listeners on key indicators after controlling for other variables, as shown below.

PMC Mali Radio Drama Jigi Ma Tignè (“Hope Is Allowed”)
Multivariate Logistic Regression (Odds Ratios)
June 2010

• Listeners were 2.6 times more likely than nonlisteners to know at least two methods of contraception. (Adjusted odds ratio with p

• Listeners were 2.6 times more likely than nonlisteners to know one or more places to obtain a method of contraception. (Adjusted odds ratio with p

• Listeners were 1.5 times more likely than nonlisteners to say “yes” when asked if they have “ever used a contraceptive method.” (Adjusted odds ratio with p=.0032 controlling for age, sex, and education).

• Listeners were 1.8 times more likely than nonlisteners to say they “currently use something to delay or avoid pregnancy.” (Adjusted odds ratio with p=.00121 controlling for age, education, marital status, and urban/rural location).

• Listeners were 3.4 times more likely than nonlisteners to say they “approve of using contraceptive methods.” (Adjusted odds ratio with p=.0005 controlling for age, sex, marital status, education and urban/rural location).

• Listeners were 2.1 times more likely than nonlisteners to say that the “health of the mother” is the reason they approve of using contraceptive methods. (Adjusted odds ratio with p

• Listeners were 2.1 times more likely than nonlisteners to say they “discussed birth spacing with their spouse/partner in the last 12 months.” (Adjusted odds ratio with p

• Respondents who were not using contraception at the time of the survey were asked if they “intend to adopt a method of contraception in the future.” Results show that listeners were 1.5 times more likely than nonlisteners to say “yes.” (Adjusted odds ratio with p=.0123 controlling for age, sex, and education).

• Listeners were 1.8 times more likely than nonlisteners to say they “favor equality between the sexes.” (Adjusted odds ratio with p

• Listeners were 1.8 times more likely than nonlisteners to believe AIDS is a fatal disease. (Adjusted odds ratio with p

• Listeners were 2.4 times more likely than nonlisteners to say they “approve of condom use as a means to prevent AIDS.” (Adjusted odds ratio with p=.0008 controlling for sex, education, marital status, and urban/rural location).

• Listeners were 1.7 times more likely than nonlisteners to say “yes” when asked if they will “use a condom in the future.” (Adjusted odds ratio with p=.0125 controlling for age, sex, education, and marital status).

• Listeners were 1.8 times more likely than nonlisteners to say “yes” when asked if they “discussed HIV/AIDS with anyone in the last 12 months.”(Adjusted odds ratio with p

• Listeners were 1.7 times more likely than nonlisteners to say that “people with disabilities have a right to prosthetics.” (Adjusted odds ratio with p

• Listeners were 1.9 times more likely than nonlisteners to know of a source of information for people with disabilities. (Adjusted odds ratio with p=.0003 controlling for age, education, and urban/rural location).

• Listeners were 3.3 times more likely than nonlisteners to have spoken with someone they know about rights of people with disabilities. (Adjusted odds ratio with p


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