Wildlife filmmaker Chris Palmer shows that animals are often set up to succeed

November 3, 2010 • Daily Email Recap

Thanks to PMC Program Advisory Board member Chris Palmer for this link to an article about his recent book by the Washington Post.
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Not long after Chris Palmer broke into environmental filmmaking in the early 1980s, he brought home a newly completed film to show his wife, Gail.

She loved it — especially the close-up of the grizzly bear splashing in a stream. She asked Palmer how the crew had captured the sound of water dripping from the bear’s paws. He confessed: The sound guy had miked up a water basin and recorded splashing sounds made by his own hands.

She turned to him and said, “You’re a big fake.”

Three decades later, Palmer hasn’t quite recovered. And, at 63, he has written a confessional for an entire industry. “Shooting in the Wild,” published this year by Sierra Club Books, exposes the unpleasant secrets of environmental filmmaking: manufactured sounds, staged fights, wild animals that aren’t quite wild filmed in nature that isn’t entirely natural.

For full article, visit:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/09/21/AR2010092105782.html


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