Questions to Ask Your Elected and Appointed Officials

November 23, 2011 • Daily Email Recap

Thanks to Roger Martin of Population Matters in the UK for this list of questions, which you can adapt to use in your country.

UK Population Growth:  Draft PQs

1.      To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many new jobs he estimates need to be created each year simply to keep pace with current population growth.

2.      To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer for his estimate of the cost of providing the additional public infrastructure at current standards for the additional 10 million UK residents projected for 2033.

3.      To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change for his estimate of the additional CO2 emissions likely to be generated by the additional 10 million UK residents projected for 2033, or the additional renewable energy capacity needed to abate them and maintain current total emissions.

4.      To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what long-term estimates she has made of the prospects for UK food security in 2050 at the extremes of the population range ONS currently project (64-82 million -ie an increase of 2-20 million).

5.      To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether she will instruct water companies to factor into their long-term investment plans the upper and lower limits of ONS population projections (eg an increase of 2-20 million by 2050).

6.      To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether she will instruct her Department routinely to raise future population growth as a variable to be addressed rather than a datum to be accommodated.

7.      To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what estimate he has made of the additional road and rail infrastructure required to meet demand at current standards for the upper and lower limits of the ONS-projected population by 2050 (64-82 million -ie an increase of 2-20 million).

8.      To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government for his estimate of the Planning implications of total housing need at the upper and lower limits of the ONS-projected population by 2050 (64-82 million -ie an increase of 2-20 million).

9.      To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what plans he has to balance the increase in supply of new housing with stabilization of demand so that the market can eventually clear; or whether he envisages both demand and supply increasing indefinitely without limit.

10.  To ask the Prime Minister whether he shares the view of the 1973 Population Panel, that Britain would be better off with a stable than a growing population; and whether he will add ‘population’ to the portfolio of [Francis Maude] so that all the issues arising from rapid population growth can be considered across all relevant Departments, and sustainable population objectives set.

11.  To ask the Prime Minister how he proposes to respond to the widespread desire for a smaller rather than a larger population in the UK, as revealed in recent public opinion polls.

Roger Martin

Chair, Population Matters

18.9.2011

International Population Growth: Draft PQs

1.      To ask [the Government] what plans it has to mark the global population reaching 7 billion on 31 October.

2.      To ask the Foreign Secretary whether he believes the large global problems he addresses would be easier to solve at the lower than upper limit of the population range the UN project for 2050 (8.1-10.6 billion, a range of 2.5 billion, ie the entire population of the Earth in 1950); and if he will make a statement.

3.      To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if she will draw attention in the preparations for ‘Rio + 20′ to the importance of population stabilization for sustainable development, and to the comment by the Secretary-General of the first Earth Summit that: “Either we reduce our population voluntarily, or nature will do it for us brutally’.

4.      To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will encourage the EU and African Groups at the UNFCCC to recognize the factual links between population growth, carbon emissions and adaptation problems, so that climate funds may be invested in the family planning and women’s education and empowerment programmes necessary for long-term population and climate stabilization.

5.      To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will explain to his EU colleagues their wider global interest in stabilizing populations, and thus the need to increase aid for family planning from its current level of 0.4% of total EU aid.

Roger Martin

Chair, Population Matters

18.9.2011

Draft Early Day Motion

This House believes that a stable rather than an ever-increasing population, in the UK and globally, is in the national and global interest.


Current World Population

7,741,289,482

Net Growth During Your Visit

0

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