The Incredible Expanding Adventures of the X Chromosome

December 19, 2011 • Daily Email Recap

Thanks to Leta Finch for this article from Psychology Today. See http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/201109/the-incredible-expanding-adventures-the-x-chromosome

The Incredible Expanding Adventures of the X Chromosome

Genes housed on the X chromosome shed new light on the human mind, including why identical female twins differ more than male twins, why there are more male geniuses and male autists, and why you may have mom to thank for your brains.

By Christopher Badcock Ph.D., published on September 06, 2011 – last reviewed on October 31, 2011

In the early 1980s I met and began an unofficial training with Anna Freud-Sigmund Freud’s youngest daughter, and his only child to follow him into psychoanalysis. I was a young social scientist who had been carrying out a self-analysis for some years.

Anna Freud’s couch was a daybed on which I lay, with her seated in a chair at its head. On one or two occasions I couldn’t help but think that the voice I heard coming from her chair was in fact that of her father, speaking to me from beyond the grave.

I can even recall her exact words in one case. I had been free-associating about my attempt to analyze myself when Anna Freud remarked, “In your self-analysis you sank a deep but narrow shaft into your unconscious. Here we clear the whole area, layer by layer.” This produced a spine-tingling reaction in me, and I surprised Miss Freud (as I called her) by stating that her remark reminded me of her father, because he was particularly fond of archaeological metaphors in his published writings. Most people would simply attribute her statement to the influence of her father’s writing on her own choice of words. Thirty years ago, I would probably have said the same. But today, having spent decades researching the links between genetics and psychology, I can offer a different hypothesis, one that goes to the core of all we now know about the inheritance and expression of genes in the brain.

To read the full article, please click here: http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/201109/the-incredible-expanding-adventures-the-x-chromosome


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