Time to Tackle ‘Last Taboo’ of Contraception and Climate – Experts

March 14, 2012 • Climate Change & Mitigation, Family Planning, Daily Email Recap

I first saw this report on the revamped All Africa site; it quotes Kavita Ramdas, executive director of Stanford University’s social entrepreneurship program, as saying that the population and climate connection need to be made “…in a place where we can talk thoughtfully about the fact that yes, more people on this planet – and we’ve just crossed 7 billion – does actually put pressure on the planet. And no, it is not just black women or brown women or Chinese women who create that problem.”

You can also watch a webcast of the event being reported on here:

http://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/womens-health-key-to-climate-adaptation-strategies

See here for the article: http://allafrica.com/stories/201202291096.html

Time to Tackle ‘Last Taboo’ of Contraception and Climate – Experts

New York – Finding a way to put the environmental impact of population and women’s reproductive health more prominently on the climate change agenda is increasingly urgent, experts said in Washington this week.

Suggesting a strong connection between family planning and the environment often risks an explosion in the highly charged political landscape of climate talks, meaning the word “population” is rarely heard, observed speakers on a panel assembled by the Wilson Center’s Environmental Change and Security Program (ECSP).

Kavita Ramdas, executive director of Stanford University’s social entrepreneurship program, calls making the link between population and the environment “the last taboo”.

“This connection … needs to be in a place where we can talk thoughtfully about the fact that yes, more people on this planet – and we’ve just crossed 7 billion – does actually put pressure on the planet. And no, it is not just black women or brown women or Chinese women who create that problem,” she told a session on women’s health and climate adaptation strategies.

“In fact, the issues around consumption in the more developed part of the world are profoundly significant. And when you know that every American baby born consumes 40 times as much as every Indian baby born, clearly there is a need to be able to tie those issues together,” she added.

Daniel Schensul, a technical specialist in the climate change, population and development branch of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), noted that adapting to a shifting climate amounts to building resilience in the face of change. “Women’s ability to control fertility, I think, is at the very centre of this,” he said.

To read the rest of the article, click here: http://allafrica.com/stories/201202291096.html


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