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Twenty more “Niles” needed to feed growing population-leaders

September 17, 2012 • Water, Daily Email Recap

Below is an article from the Chicago Tribune, reporting on a new study of the global water crisis authored by the InterAction Council (IAC) — a group of 40 prominent former government leaders and heads of state. In her foreword to the report, ” The Global Water Crisis: Addressing an Urgent Security Issue (PDF),” IAC member and former Norwegian Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland, underlined the danger in many regions, particularly sub-Saharan Africa or West Asia and North Africa, where critical water shortages already exist.

As some of these nations are already politically unstable, such crises may have regional repercussions that extend well beyond their political boundaries.  But even in politically stable regions, the status quo may very well be disturbed first and most dramatically by the loss of stability in hydrological patterns.”

Twenty more “Niles” needed to feed growing population-leaders
See: http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2012-09-10/business/sns-rt-us-waterbre88913w-20120910_1_water-scarcity-domestic-water-population-growth

OSLO (Reuters) – The world needs to find the equivalent of the flow of 20 Nile rivers by 2025 to grow enough food to feed a rising population and help avoid conflicts over water scarcity, a group of former leaders said on Monday.

Factors such as climate change would strain freshwater supplies and nations including China and India were likely to face shortages within two decades, they said, calling on the U.N. Security Council to get more involved.

“The future political impact of water scarcity may be devastating,” former Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien said of a study issued by a group of 40 former leaders he co-chairs including former U.S. President Bill Clinton and Nelson Mandela.

“It will lead to some conflicts,” Chretien told reporters on a telephone conference call, highlighting tensions such as in the Middle East over the Jordan River.

The study, by the InterAction Council of former leaders, said the U.N. Security Council should make water the top concern. Until now, the Security Council has treated water as a factor in other crises, such as Sudan or the impact of global warming.

It said that about 3,800 cubic km (910 cubic miles) of fresh water was taken from rivers and lakes every year.

“With about 1 billion more mouths to feed worldwide by 2025, global agriculture alone will require another 1,000 cubic km (240 cubic miles) of water per year,” it said. The world population now is just over 7 billion.

The increase was “equal to the annual flow of 20 Niles or 100 Colorado Rivers”, according to the report, also backed by the U.N. University’s Institute for Water, Environment and Health (UNWEH) and Canada’s Gordon Foundation.

To read the full article, please click here: http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2012-09-10/business/sns-rt-us-waterbre88913w-20120910_1_water-scarcity-domestic-water-population-growth


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