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Nigeria, #FP2020 and Unfulfilled Pledges

December 9, 2013 • Family Planning, Reproductive Health, Nigeria, News

Nigeria, FP2020 and Unfulfilled Pledges
By Aminu Magashi, Nov. 26th, 2013
See: http://allafrica.com/stories/201311260545.html?viewall=1

It was sensational and fulfilling when Nigeria got the international applause on the 11th July 2012 at a London Summit on Family Planning tagged FP2020. The London summit was facilitated by UK Government, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, UNFPA and many international donors and partners. It was aimed at mobilizing global policy, financing, commodity, and service delivery commitments to support the rights of an additional 120 million women and girls in the world’s poorest countries to use contraceptive information, services and supplies, without coercion or discrimination, by 2020.

Nigeria government had spoken so eloquently at the London Summit and reiterated that “in addition to our current annual commitment of US$3 million for the procurement of reproductive health commodities, we are now committing to provide an additional US$8,350,000 annually over the next four years, making a total of US$33,400,000 over the next four years.

This is an increase of 300 percent.” “In our quest to save one million lives in Nigeria by 2015, we consider all lives have equal value. The Federal Government of Nigeria remains fully committed to meeting unmet needs for reproductive health services and commodities, including family planning. This will be done in an integrated, collaborative manner. By doing that Nigeria highlighted that “Within the context of our desire to enhance maternal and child survival, as well as accelerate our demographic transition, we are committed to achieving the goal of a contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) of 36 percent by 2018. Achieving this goal will mean averting at least 31,000 maternal deaths. Over 700,000 mothers will be prevented from injuries or long-term complications due to childbirth.”

To read the full article, please click here: http://allafrica.com/stories/201311260545.html?viewall=1



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