Ashreat Al Amal

Sudan

PMC produced Ashreat Al Amal (“Sails of Hope”) in Sudan. This 144-episode radio serial drama aired November 17, 2004 through June 30, 2006 in Arabic, which is one of the official languages of Sudan.

Ashreat Al Amal aired in Sudan twice per week on Radio Omdurman and was the longest serial ever to be aired on Sudanese radio. The episodes were 15 minutes each and the airtime was donated by the government’s Ministry of Information and Communication.

As with all PMC radio serial dramas, Ashreat Al Amal was created using PMC’s serial drama methodology.


Making a Difference

Significant improvements were made over the period of the project with regard to improving the status of women, increasing communication between partners about HIV/AIDS, improving people’s understanding of the fatal nature of HIV/AIDS, and increasing awareness of methods of contraception. The monitoring data showed an increase in the percentage of clinic clients listening to Ashreat al Amal over the course of the broadcast period, indicating that it was a popular program among our target audience.

Monitoring data collected in 2005 in Omdurman, Khartoum and Khartoum North showed an increase in the percentage of reproductive health clinic clients who had listened to Ashreat al Amal. Between April and August 2005, the percentage of clinic clients who had listened in Omdurman increased from 9 percent to 32 percent, and the percentage of clinic clients in Khartoum who had listened increased from 17 percent to 32 percent. 

An independent evaluation of Ashreat Al Amal, conducted from July-August 2006 by a team from the University of Khartoum found that:

  • Respondents were over 2.5 times more likely to have discussed HIV/AIDS with their partners after the program than respondents at the baseline.
  • 65.4% of respondents supported eradicating female genital mutilation at endline, compared with 56.5% of respondents reporting that eradicating female circumcision was not at all important to them at baseline.

2.5X

Listeners were 2.5 times more likely to have discussed HIV/AIDS with their partners after the program than non-listeners.

(Clinic Monitoring)

65.4%

65.4% of listeners supported the eradication of Female Genital Mutilation, compared with 56.5% of respondents reporting that eradicating female circumcision was not at all important to them at baseline.

(Clinic Monitoring)

15%

Between April and August 2005 (mid-broadcast), the percentage of clinic clients in Khartoum who had listened increased 15% (from 17% to 32%).

(Clinic Monitoring)

Project Information

Title: Ashreat Al Amal (“Sails of Hope”)
Format: Radio Serial Drama
Location: Sudan
Language: Arabic
Duration: November 17, 2004-June 30, 2006

PMC Country Administrative Team:
Country Representative: Musa Mohamed Salih Beirag
Program Assistant: Mohamed Osman Makki

PMC Country Creative Team:
Writers: Omar Shareef, Anas, Sadick, Fauwzia Daniel

Storylines


Awatif’s story

Awatif (a transitional character) is a sacrificing and hardworking wife and mother. She is exhausted by the burden of taking care of her six children. Awatif’s husband, Hassan, refuses to assist Awatif in raising the children, and so she is forced to continue working far into each pregnancy, becoming physically weak and anaemic. Faulting Awatif for her weakness and constant exhaustion, Hassan takes a second, much younger wife, leaving Awatif all by herself to care of all of their children. When Hassan has second thoughts and wants to return to Awatif, she demands that they start using family planning methods. After visiting a clinic together, and receiving sound advice from Rugaia, a local reproductive health educator, Hassan and Awatif become adopters of birth control.

Issues this storyline addresses:

Hamid’s story

Hamid is a well-intentioned young man who gets caught up with Jabir out of desperation to earn money. Jabir, a criminal, takes advantage of Hamid’s innocence and brings him into a life of drugs and violence. It’s through Jabir that Hamid meets and marries Al Shoul, a midwife who believes in old practices and makes her money circumcising women. Hamid and Al Shoul get pregnant, but Al Shoul has birth complications and needs a blood transfusion. It’s during this blood transfusion that Hamid discovers he is HIV positive, as are Al Shoul and their baby girl. This sobering experience changes Hamid’s perspective and his behavior. He becomes an advocate for reproductive health and HIV prevention, and he works to fight the stigma that HIV patients face. Hamid even supports a successful women’s rights activist, Nahla, in publishing a magazine about reproductive health and family planning.


This project funded by

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