Pambazuko

Democratic Republic of the Congo

PMC produced Pambazuko (“New Dawn”) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. This 156-episode drama aired from February 2016 to August 2017 in eastern Congo in Swahili, one of the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s national languages.

Pambazuko was broadcast over 14 community radio stations, members of the Hirondelle network, in eastern Congo, including the former Oriental Province, Maniema, North Kivu, South Kivu, and the former Katanga Province. Pambazuko is one of three unique serial dramas PMC produced in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Vivra Verra (“Time Will Tell”) was broadcast nationwide on Radio Okapi in French and Elembo (“Footprint”) was broadcast in two provinces in the local language Lingala.

As with all PMC radio serial dramas, Pambazuko was created using PMC’s serial drama methodology.

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Making a Difference

An estimated 680,000 Congolese heard of Pambazuko and an estimated 350,000 Congolese regularly listened to Pambazuko, making the cost per regular Pambazuko listener $2.86 USD (listened once or more every week for 1.5 years).

Family Planning
• Listeners were 2.4 times more likely than non-listeners to say “Yes” when asked “In general, do you approve of family planning?”
• Listeners were 2.8 times more likely than non-listeners to say they know of a place to obtain emergency contraception
• Listeners were 1.9 times more likely than non-listeners to say they know of a place to obtain information on methods of family planning if they wanted to
• Listeners were 1.8 times more likely than non-listeners to say they think most people in their community use family planning to delay or avoid pregnancy
• Listeners were 1.8 times more likely than non-listeners to say that their ideal family size is three children or fewer
• Listeners were 1.6 times more likely than non-listeners to say that the ideal age of marriage for a girl is 18 years and older
• Listeners were 2 times more likely than non-listeners to say “Yes” when asked “Do you think you will use a contraceptive method to delay or avoid pregnancy in the next six months?”
• Listeners were 2.1 times more likely than non-listeners to say that they were currently using the male condom to delay or avoid pregnancy
• Listeners were 2 times more likely than non-listeners to say that they were currently using the female condom to delay or avoid pregnancy

Maternal and Child Health
• Listeners were 1.6 times more likely than non-listeners to say they strongly agree with the statement “A child will be protected from polio if he/she is vaccinated against the disease”
• Listeners were 1.6 times more likely than non-listeners to say they strongly agree with the statement “Mothers should take their children to the hospital when they are ill”
• Listeners were 1.5 times more likely than non-listeners to say they strongly agree with the statement “If a friend/acquaintance is pregnant, will you advise her to follow the complete immunization cycle for her child?”
• Listeners were 1.4 times more likely than non-listeners to say they strongly agree with the statement “Members of the community should encourage women to utilize reproductive health services during and post pregnancy”
• Listeners were 1.6 times more likely than non-listeners to say they strongly agree with the statement “A child will be protected from polio if he/she is vaccinated against the disease”

Empowerment of Women and Girls
• Listeners were 3.2 times more likely than non-listeners to say that girls should be encouraged to pursue their education to a high level
• Listeners were 2.1 times more likely than non-listeners to say they strongly agree with the statement “Investing in a girl’s education benefits the entire family”
• Listeners were 1.9 times more likely than non-listeners to say that they strongly agree with the statement “Girls should have equal opportunity in education as boys”
• Listeners were 1.4 times more likely than non-listeners to say they strongly agree with the statement “Families should put aside money to pay for the education of their children”
• Listeners were 1.3 times more likely than non-listeners to say they strongly agree with the statement “Most people in my community believe in the importance of educating children”

The Environment
• Listeners were 2.9 times more likely than non-listeners to say “Yes” when asked “Have you been involved in protecting animal species such as gorillas and other species in danger of extermination during the past year?”
• Listeners were 2 times more likely than non-listeners to say “Yes” when asked “Have you been involved in protecting the forest in your community during the past year?”
• Listeners were 2 times more likely than non-listeners to say “Yes” when asked “Have you been involved in planting trees in the past year?”
• Listeners were 1.9 times more likely than non-listeners to say “Yes” when asked “Have you been involved in cooking with improved ovens during the past year?”
• Listeners were 1.8 times more likely than non-listeners to say “Deforestation” when asked “What do you think are the causes of environmental degradation?”
• Listeners were 1.7 times more likely than non-listeners to say that they strongly agree with the statement “Poachers who traffic in protected species should be reported to the police”
• Listeners were 1.4 times more likely than non-listeners to say that they strongly agree with the statement “Having a small family size will have less impact on the environment”
• Listeners were 1.3 times more likely than non-listeners to say that they strongly agree with the statement “Protecting the habitat of gorillas and chimpanzees is good for my community”

Violence and Post-Conflict
• Listeners were 1.5 times more likely than non-listeners to respond “call the police” when asked, “What would you do if you see a man rape a woman?”
• Listeners were 1.4 times more likely than non-listeners to state that they strongly disagree with the statement “If I discover that a member of my family had been raped, I would like to keep it a secret”
• Listeners were 1.3 times more likely than non-listeners to state that they strongly disagree with the statement “If a woman does not show physical resistance when she is being forced to have sex, you cannot call it a rape”
• Listeners were 1.4 times more likely than non-listeners to say “unwanted pregnancy” when asked, “What are the consequences of rape for the victim’s health?”

3.2X

Listeners 3.2 times more likely to say girls should be encouraged to pursue their education to a high level

(Pambazuko Endline Evaluation)

2.4X

Listeners were 2.4 times more likely to say that in general, they approve of family planning

(Pambazuko Endline Evaluation)

2.9X

Listeners were 2.9 times more likely to say they had been involved in protecting animal species during the past year

(Pambazuko Endline Evaluation)

Project Information

Title: Pambazuko (“The Dawn”)
Format: Radio Serial Drama
Location: Democratic Republic of the Congo
Language: Swahili
Duration: February 2016 – August 2017

Visit Pambazuko’s Facebook Page!

Download DR Congo Broadcast Map

Administrative Team:
Country Representative: Gabin K. Mabanzila
Technical Assistant: Philippe Ntonda
Finance Assistant: Lucien Koli
Administrative Assistant: Carel Mvuama
Driver: Charles Mfutila Tokodiangani

Creative Team:
Producer: Mathy Babaka Vangu
Studio Technicians: John Kabuika Tshibasu, Patrick Mayamba, Grace Mbuya Ntembo, Déogratias Luzitu Uyonduka
Head Writer: Trésor Amis Mandanda
Writers: Ella Iranga Nshombo, Tharcille Kahindo Munyenze, Erick Kayembe

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Storylines


Jaribu's Story

Jaribu, a young man living in the realities of post-war poverty, discovers that poverty is a vicious cycle that allows people to be tempted to delve into all sorts of illicit trafficking, such as poaching. With a salary too small to meet the needs of his family, Jaribu is influenced by his friend, Pilipili. Pilipili is involved in lots of illegal trafficking and is a rapist. Jaribu becomes a rapist. In this world, rape has become a means of retaliation to avenge a mother, wife, sister, or daughter who was a victim. Jaribu has never recovered from the rape of his sister, Feza. Feza tries to show Jaribu the dangers and immorality of the decisions he’s making and work with him to find another way to survive.


Sheriya's Story

A marriage has just been celebrated in Kanyakoma – that of Sheriya and Asumani. Asumani is a very jealous husband and won’t even let Sheriya go to the market. This jealousy combined with his upbringing creates a troubling reality for Sheriya when she gets pregnant. Asumani will not allow her to seek any medical care because he swears by traditional medicine – he is the son of a witch doctor. Iranga, Sheriya’s older sister, insists that she Sheriya be allowed to visit a doctor. Eventually the baby is born at home, but even though Sheriya and the baby are healthy, the baby’s low birth weight causes them to go to the hospital. As Sheriya navigates difficult realities to protect her health and the health of her baby, we see a world where even an educated woman has no right to speak because women exist only for procreation.


Mawazo's Story

Mawazo is a young 14-year-old boy who lives in Madoa (a city). He loves school, but he must interrupt his studies because he is too poor to continue. His mother, Mifano, is an alcoholic. Faced with horrible realities and pressures to support the family, Mifano must find a way to feed his mother and sister faida. Mawazo wants to imitate his cousin Masumbuko who pays his school fees himself, combining study and work. Mawazo finds work in a mine and it is through his experience that we discover the hell of child labor in the quarries and see the many factors that can impact a child’s opportunity to receive an education.


Machozi's Story

Machozi is 24 years old, married, and has four children. She lives in Tamu tamu, a small village on Lake Ruze and feeds her family by selling yams and taro that she grows. Her husband, Ayali, is a drunkard and does not help feed or educate the children. Machozi must provide for the family and rely on her daughter Sheila, who is seven years old, to look after the other children when she’s absent. The children are often sick, but her husband refuses to hear about hospitals or vaccination because he prefers his family to be treated by Nyembo, the healer in the village. Machozi, despite the advice of her older brother Mwema, blindly obeys her husband for fear of being repudiated. That’s when the tragedy occurs: her youngest child, Tati, is struck by polio and loses the use of his legs.


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