Marine Protection


85%

percent of the world’s fisheries are fully exploited, overexploited, depleted, or recovering from depletion.

(World Wildlife Foundation)


The impact of man’s overdevelopment and pollution of our planet isn’t limited to our skies, rivers, and landfills. The acidification of our oceans, depletion of our fisheries, destruction of coral reefs, and extinction of marine species are among the worst environmental issues we currently face.

Around the world, millions of people rely on fishing as a primary source of nutrition and income. Yet the World Wildlife Foundation reports that 85 percent of the world’s fisheries are fully exploited, overexploited, depleted, or recovering from depletion. Many other aquatic species such as dolphins, turtles, birds, sharks, and corals are killed due to inefficient, illegal, and destructive fishing practices. The same CO2 emissions responsible for global warming are also absorbed by our oceans and converted to carbonic acid, making the oceans less and less hospitable to aquatic life, exacerbating the problem further.

As a result of PMC’s radio serial drama Nau Em Taim (“Now is the Time”) in Papua New Guinea, listeners were significantly more active than non-listeners in marine species conservation (22% vs. 8%). At the community level, activity in marine conservation was twice as likely, rising from seven percent to 14 percent.

Projects addressing this topic:

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