Umurage

Rwanda

PMC produced Umurage ("Inheritance for a Better Future") in Rwanda. This 156-episode radio show aired from June 2017 through June 2018 in Kinyarwanda, one of Rwanda’s official languages.

Umurage aired three times a week on eight different radio stations in Rwanda as well as episodes uploaded to a Youtube channel. PMC worked with a team of local administrators to create a Rwandan NGO, Umurage Communication for Development (UmC), to oversee production and development of this show.

As with all PMC radio shows, Umurage was created using PMC’s radio show methodology.


Making a Difference

PMC has finished analyzing the endline findings from Umurage, and we are pleased to share them below to understand how this entertaining show has impacted Rwandans in regards to child protection, family planning/reproductive health, nutrition, and gender-based violence.

Theme: Child Protection

  • Listeners were 1.6 times more likely than non-listeners to report knowledge of at least one sign of sexual abuse of children.
  • Listeners were 2.5 times more likely than non-listeners to state that a parent is not justified in hitting his/her children for any one of four reasons stated below.*
    • *Reasons: 1) If they perform badly in school because of doing household chores, 2) If they disobey their parents, 3) If they are impolite to their parents, or 4) If they embarrassed the family.
  • Listeners were 1.5 times more likely than non-listeners to state that people in their community report incidents of child labor to officials.
  • Listeners were 1.6 times more likely than non-listeners to state that people in their community report incidents of rape and other sexual advances to officials.
  • Listeners were 1.2 times more likely than non-listeners to say that they are very confident they can get child protection and other social services if they needed them.
  • Listeners were 1.5 times more likely than non-listeners to say that they discuss child protection and other social welfare programs with their spouse/partner.

 

Theme: Youth Reproductive Health

  • Listeners were 1.7 times more likely than non-listeners to say they have discussed risky behaviors related to early pregnancy in the last six months with their peers.
  • Listeners were 3.9 times more likely than non-listeners to say they have discussed unsafe sex with their peers in the last 6 months.
  • Listeners were 2.0 times more likely than non-listeners to say they have discussed dropping out of school due to pregnancy with their peers in the last 6 months.
  • Listeners were 2.5 times more likely than non-listeners to say they have discussed having sex with older men/women with their peers in the last 6 months.
  • Respondents who are parents of teenagers were asked whether they had discussed risky behaviors with their teenage children in the last six months, those who said “Yes” were asked, “How often?”: Listeners were 2.2 times more likely than non-listeners to say “Frequently.”
  • Listeners were 1.3 times more likely than non-listeners to say they and their partner are currently doing something or using any method to delay or avoid pregnancy.

 

Theme: Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV)

  • Listeners were 1.7 times more likely than non-listeners to say the “right to live free from violence” was a right of women and girls in Rwanda.
  • Listeners were 1.2 times more likely than non-listeners to say the “right to own property” was a right of women and girls in Rwanda.
  • Listeners were 1.9 times more likely than non-listeners to say they would “report the matter to village leader” if they witnessed a man beating his wife.


Question: “In your opinion, is a husband justified in hitting or beating his wife under any of the following circumstances?”:

  • “If she neglects the children”
    • Listeners were 2.4 times more likely than non-listeners to say “No” to the above response.
  • “If she argues with him?”
    • Listeners were 2 times more likely than non-listeners to say “No” to the above response.
  • “If she refuses to have sex with him?”
    • Listeners were 1.9 times more likely than non-listeners to say “No” to the above response.
  • “If she burns the food?”
    • Listeners were 1.9 times more likely than non-listeners to say “No” to the above response.

 

Theme: Nutrition

  • Listeners were 1.7 times more likely than non-listeners to say providing foods from different food groups/sources to children aged 6-23 months “prevents malnutrition.”
  • Listeners were 1.8 times more likely than non-listeners to say providing foods from different food groups/sources to children aged 6-23 months “prevents stunted growth.”
  • Listeners were 2.1 times more likely than non-listeners to say monitoring growth at growth monitoring stations will help “children will grow up healthy.”
  • Listeners were 1.7 times more likely than non-listeners to say monitoring growth at growth monitoring stations will “prevent malnutrition.”
  • Listeners were 1.3 times more likely than non-listeners to say monitoring growth at growth monitoring stations will “prevent Kwashiorkor” (edematous malnutrition).
  • Listeners were 1.3 times more likely than non-listeners to say “Yes” that children 6-23 months old should be fed a balanced diet to prevent malnutrition and kwashiorkor.

1.6X

Listeners were 1.6 times more likely than non-listeners to state that people in their community report incidents of rape and other sexual advances to officials.

(Endline Survey)

1.7x

Listeners were 1.7 times more likely than non-listeners to say the “right to live free from violence” was a right of women and girls in Rwanda.

(Endline Survey)

1.8X

Listeners were 1.8 times more likely than non-listeners to say providing foods from different food groups/sources to children aged 6-23 months “prevents stunted growth.”

(Endline Survey)

Project Information

Title: Umurage (“Inheritance for a Better Future”)
Format: Radio Show
Location: Rwanda
Language: Kinyarwanda
Duration: June 2017-June 2018

Administrative Team:
Country representative: Jean Bosco Kwizera
Marketing and Communications Officer: Emmanuel Nuwamanya
Finance Assistant: Jean Claude Uwizeye
Administrative Assistant: Germaine Kayirangwa

Creative Team:
Producer: Theodore Nzeyimana
Studio Technician: Khaled Bizimana
Head Writer: Alfred Twahirwa
Writers: Laurance Ingabire, Terance Muhirwa, and Anaclet Bagirishya

 

News Related to this Project:


Stopping Physical and Sexual Abuse against women & children: Umurage Endline Findings from Rwanda

April 15, 2019 — PMC, along with Umurage Communication for Development, produced Umurage (“Inheritance for a Better Future”) in Rwanda. This 156-episode... Keep reading.


Inheritance for a Better Future: Results of PMC Drama in Rwanda

March 19, 2019 — Population Media Center (PMC) and PMC’s local office, Umurage Communication for Development, based in Kigali, Rwanda recently concluded national... Keep reading.


Population Media Center Launches Season 3 of Umurage in Rwanda

November 20, 2018 — Population Media Center is excited to announce Umurage (“Inheritance for a Better Future”) will be back for another season... Keep reading.


Musician Brings Unity and Hope for Social Change to Rwandan Radio Show, Umurage

August 16, 2017 — You can’t have a hit show without some catchy music. Last month Population Media Center (PMC) launched a... Keep reading.


Entertaining Ideas for a Better Future in Rwanda: A New Radio Show

July 26, 2017 — On June 27th people danced in the sun at Marasa Umubano Hotel in Kigali, Rwanda to celebrate a new... Keep reading.


Storylines


Queen's Story

Queen, a teenager from Budembe city, lives with her parents. Her parents run a successful business and Queen is secretly in love with a boy they employ. Her close friend, who is active in the community and educates young people about sexual health, warns her against spending time with him since he is involved with drugs, sex, and alcohol. When Queen’s father is arrested, she moves in with this boy and despite the warnings of her friend, she starts drinking and having sex. Queen eventually learns that this boy and her mother were engaged in a sexual relationship, and they had framed her father to get him put in jail. She then starts to take her friend’s advice, gets tested for sexually transmitted diseases, and cuts off her relationship with the boy. Her father’s innocence is revealed and he is released from jail. Queen starts working with her friend to educate youth in her community about sexual health.


Saverina's Story

Saverina is a young mother from the village Cyuza. Saverina drinks alcohol and doesn’t eat properly while she’s pregnant and she eventually suffers a stillbirth. Saverina’s mother convinces her that her stillbirth happened because her sister-in-law poisoned her. Saverina grows cold toward her sister-in-law, not trusting her and refusing to listen to her advice about maternal health and the nutritional health of her children – who are growing ill. Saverina follows her mother’s advice and uses traditional medicine until both her children become so sick that she has to take them to the local health center. After this incident, Saverina realizes that she should not trust mother’s advice about traditional medicine and works with her husband to make sure her family has a balanced nutritional diet.


Yabesi's Story

Yabesi lives in Nyarweya village with his wife and two daughters. He and his friend own a bar and it’s this friend who convinces him that unless he has a son he will not be respected in the community. Yabesi picks up many of his friend’s negative behaviors, such as drinking, beating his wife, selling all his crops for traditional medicine, and believing that men are the naturally superior head of the household. Yabesi’s sister supports his wife, urging her to go to the police and report Yabesi’s abusive behavior. She also tries to tell Yabesi how damaging his behavior is to his wife. After Yabesi’s wife miscarries a baby boy due to physical abuse, Yabesi begins to change. He apologizes and makes amends with his wife.


Dancila's Story

Dancila lives in Murera with her daughter. Abandoned by her husband, she’s struggling to support herself and her daughter. Dancila has her daughter drop out of school to work for in her cousin’s bar, where her cousin secretly is involved with drugs and human trafficking. Dancila’s cousin convinces her that her daughter will make more money if she sends her away to work in the city as a housegirl and Dancila agrees. Dancila has a friend who is appalled at her choice to send her daughter away and have her work instead of being in school, but Dancila does not listen to him. When Dancila’s daughter suffers an accident, Dancila realizes the horrible conditions her daughter has been working in and takes her home. She begins to see the negative influences of her cousin, and understands that it is important for her daughter to be in school. Her cousin’s bar is exposed and shutdown. With the help of her friend, Dancila opens a small business and finds positive ways to support herself and her daughter.

Issues this storyline addresses:

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