Impano n’Impamba

Rwanda

PMC is producing Impano n'Impamba (“A Gift For Today That Will Last a Long Time”) in Rwanda. This 104-episode radio serial drama aired from October 2014 through November 2015 in the Kinyarwanda language.

PMC worked with its local team of administrators, writers, and producers to create a Rwandan NGO, Umurage Communication for Development, to oversee the production and broadcast of the serial drama in Rwanda. Impano n’Impamba was broadcast on Radio Rwanda and on Radio Salus.

As with all PMC radio serial dramas, Impano n’Impamba was created using PMC’s serial drama methodology.

Listen Now

The success of PMC’s previous drama in Rwanda has PMC very excited to launch a new drama addressing important health and human rights issues.

Making a Difference

Impano n’Impamba was broadcast on Radio Rwanda and Radio Salus. It is estimated that more than half a million Rwandans were loyal listeners of Impano n’Impamba. It cost $1.80 US to reach each loyal listener.

Family Planning

• Listeners were 4.1 times more likely than non-listeners to say they had heard of any methods of family planning.
• Listeners were 2.1 times more likely than non-listeners to know of a place where they could obtain family planning
• Listeners were 1.5 times more likely than non-listeners to say that their ideal family size was between zero and three children as opposed to four children or more
• Listeners were 4.2 times more likely than non-listeners to report discussing family planning with their spouse/partner three or more times in the past three months
• Listeners were 1.6 times more likely than non-listeners to report discussing family planning with their family, friends, and/or neighbors in the past three months
• Listeners were 1.4 times more likely than non-listeners to believe that people important to them seek information and advice about how to plan or prevent a pregnancy
• Listeners were 1.4 times more likely than non-listeners to say that they felt comfortable talking about menstruation

 

Gender Equity

• Listeners were 3.2 times more likely than non-listeners to disagree with the statement that “it is a waste of time and money to have girls study to a high level”
• Listeners were 1.7 times more likely than non-listeners to think that a woman has the right to refuse sex to her spouse/partner
• Listeners were 1.6 times more likely than non-listeners to disagree with the statement that “a woman must ask permission from her husband before leaving the house”
• Listeners were 1.5 times more likely than non-listeners to disagree with the statement that “a man is worth more than a woman”

 

Maternal and Child Health

• Listeners were 1.6 times more likely than non-listeners to know that the correct age to introduce curdled milk/yogurt, or cheese into an infant’s diet is six months
• Listeners were 1.5 times more likely than non-listeners to know the correct age to introduce fruit into an infant’s diet is six months

 

Sexual and Reproductive Health

• Listeners were 2.4 times more likely than non-listeners to reply that a person can contract AIDS by having unprotected sex with a person who has HIV/AIDS
• Listeners were 1.9 times more likely than non-listeners to know that consistently using a condom can prevent contracting HIV
• Listeners were 2.1 times more likely than non-listeners to know that using herbs from a traditional healer cannot reduce the risk of contracting HIV
• Listeners were 2 times more likely than non-listeners to say that a teacher living with HIV/AIDS should be allowed to teach
• Listeners were 1.8 times more likely than non-listeners to say that they would be willing to buy vegetables from a person living with HIV/AIDS
• Listeners were 1.5 times more likely than non-listeners to say they talk to their family, friends, and/or neighbors about HIV/AIDS

 

$1.80 US

It cost $1.80 US to reach loyal listeners with important messages for 1.5 years of broadcast

(PMC Endline)

66%

66% of clinic attendees sampled at eight health clinics across Rwanda had heard of Impano n'Impamba

(PMC Clinic Monitoring)

3.2X

Listeners were 3.2 times more likely than non-listeners to disagree that "it is a waste of time and money to have girls study to a high level"

(PMC Endline)

Project Information

Title: Impano n’Impamba (“A Gift For Today That Will Last a Long Time”)
Format: Radio Serial Drama
Location: Rwanda
Language: Kinyarwanda
Duration: October 2014 – November 2015

Download Rwanda Broadcast Map

Administrative Team:
Country Representative: Emmanuel Rugira
Technical Assistant: Théodore Nzeyimana
Studio Technician: Khaled Bizimana
Administrative Assistant: Germaine Kayirangwa
Driver: Innocent Mubiligi
Cleaner: Sammuel Nshimiyimana

Creative Team:
Head Writer/Producer: Alfred Twahirwa
Writers: Laurence Ingabire, Anaclet Bagirishya, Terence Muhirwa

News Related to this Project:


Umuganda: Communities and ‘Super Stars’ Join Together for a Common Purpose

March 2, 2015 — RWAMAGANA DISTRICT, RWANDA– On Saturday January 31st, 2015, solidarity and kinship were hard at work as Rwandans joined... Keep reading.


Babinyujije mu ikinamico “impano n’impamba” basobanurira abaturage kuboneza urubyaro

February 2, 2015 — PMC has pasted the text of this article here. It is written in Kinyarwanda. See original post in IGIHE.... Keep reading.


A Handball Game in Rwanda Has Goals Beyond the Net, Impacting Child Nutrition and Family Planning

January 22, 2015 — KIGALI, RWANDA–On Sunday, January 11th, a crowd gathered around the handball court at Kimisagara, the biggest youth center... Keep reading.


Population Media Center Capacity Building with South-to-South Training

April 14, 2014 — SHELBURNE, VT – When Gabin Kifukiau accepted the job of Country Representative in the Democratic Republic of Congo... Keep reading.


Storylines


Sifa's story

Sifa is 30 years old and was forced into marriage at age 18 to Mavumvu, a violent man whose main activity is smuggling and importing contraband. They own a farm together and Sifa farms potatoes for a cooperative, while Mavumvu travels to many different border towns for his business, leaving his wife alone for days at a time. He drinks often at his friend Barahira’s bar and has girlfriends on the side, all the while insulting his wife and accusing her of sleeping with other men. When Mavumvu closes their joint bank account, Sifa can no longer pay her contribution to remain in the cooperative or send her children to school. Mavumvu blames Sifa for being useless and irresponsible, telling her that his children need a better mother who can earn money for their upkeep. Sifa confides in Helena, wife of the bar owner, Barahira, and reveals that Mavumvu’s beatings caused Sifa to miscarry. Helena promises to talk to her husband to see if they can find a solution. Barahira advises Mavumvu that he should stop mistreating her, and tells him “a real man does not beat a woman.” Sifa works hard on her farm and, after a good harvest, opens her own account and rejoins the cooperative. With the help of Barahira, Helena and other women start a support group for Sifa and other women experiencing violence from their spouses. Empowered by her friends’ support and own economic independence, Sifa finally confronts her husband about his illegal activities. In the end, Mavumvu is arrested when he is discovered to be planning a kidnap for ransom scheme with his concubine.


Ketia's story

Ketia, a tall and beautiful 17-year-old, attends a prestigious secondary school for wealthy families. Materialistic and impulsive, she begins having sex and experimenting with alcohol with her boyfriend Rukuba. They do not use protection, despite the advice of her best friend Sandra, president of the Fertility Awareness Club, and stepmother Afisa, a reproductive health researcher. Neglecting her studies, Ketia fails her National Examination and must repeat her third year of secondary school. When she and Rukuba are discovered by a guard having a drunken tryst in a public bathroom, they flee and are injured falling into a ditch. In the hospital, Ketia learns she has gonorrhea and that Rukuba has been consorting with several other girls and prostitutes. She ends the relationship, commits herself to her studies, joins the Fertility Awareness Club with Sandra, and shares her story as a warning to other girls. Rukuba, meanwhile, continues to have promiscuous, unprotected sex. In the end, Rukuba is diagnosed with HIV.


Bacyenga's story

Bacyenga is a young man of 25 eager to marry his girlfriend Rosine and start a large family. Coming from a large family himself, Bacyenga didn’t go far in school, but he does use his earnings from the small store he owns to pay his brothers’ and sisters’ school fees. He believes having many children means more prosperity and a strong public standing in the community. After marrying, Rosine quickly becomes pregnant and is pregnant again six months after the birth of her first child. Family life is not what Rosine envisioned; she retreats to her parents’ home overwhelmed by her responsibilities. Bacyenga can’t understand why his wife is unhappy and seeks advice from his cousin Ngunga. Together they try—and fail—to convince Rosine to return. Rosine believes Bacyenga spends too much money on his siblings and doesn’t give enough attention to his own new family. She reveals the second pregnancy to her husband and asks, “If you cannot take care of me and just one child, how are we going to survive when we have two?” Ngunuga advises Bacyenga to visit the local health clinic to learn about fertility and family planning, but he sees no reason to limit the number of children he has and disregards the health worker’s advice. Rosine still does not return home, his child falls ill and requires a costly month-long hospitalization, and his business begins to fail. Only then does Bacyenga begin to understand the value of respecting his wife and family’s needs and planning pregnancies together.


Kagaju’s story

Kagaju is a 28-year-old mother, wife, farmer, and business woman. Kagaju walks to the village market every afternoon to sell vegetables and comes home in the evening to prepare supper for her family. She is a good cook, but she knows nothing about nutrition and her children suffer from malnutrition. She becomes pregnant and discovers that she is anemic. Her husband does not allow her to go to the health clinic, saying that the family does not have enough money. Instead, her mother-in-law gives her herbs and moves into the family’s home. Due to complications, Kagaju is unable to deliver at home and is taken the health clinic at the last minute. She learns that she had been carrying twins, but one of them had died before they arrived at the clinic. Thankfully, Kagaju survives, along with one of her babies. Eventually, Kagaju learns the importance of nutrition and watches her children grow healthy and strong.


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