Jigi ma Tignè

Mali

PMC produced Jigi ma Tignè (“Hope is Allowed”) in Mali. This 74-episode radio serial drama aired from March 23, 2009 to September 28, 2009 in Bambara, the official language of Mali.

Jigi ma Tignè, aired twice per week in Mali. It consisted of 15-minute episodes on ORTM (Mali’s national radio network) and 50 local community radio stations (members of the national association of community radio stations, URTEL). The prominence of the broadcast and the powerful storylines led to 50 percent of those interviewed having heard of the program. PMC also partnered with Trickle Up, a US-based organization working with disabled persons in northern Mali, and the Malian Federation of Associations Working with Handicapped Persons (FEMAPH) to address the disabilities storyline supported by USAID.

As with all PMC radio serial dramas, Jigi ma Tignè was created using PMC’s serial drama methodology.

Listen Now

Making a Difference

Jigi ma Tignè made an impact on listeners throughout Mali, at a community level and with individual impact and reactions from listeners. At the end of the program, research results included the following results:

Rights and Problems of People Living With Disabilities

• Listeners were 3.3 times more likely than non-listeners to have spoken with someone they know about rights of people with disabilities.
• Listeners were 1.7 times more likely than non-listeners to say that “people with disabilities have a right to prosthetics.”
• Listeners were 1.9 times more likely than non-listeners to know where disabled people can seek information or get services.

Contraception and Family Planning

• Listeners were 2.6 times more likely than non-listeners to report knowing at least two modern methods of contraception.
• Listeners were 2.6 times more likely than non-listeners to know one or more places to obtain a method of contraception.
• Listeners were 3.4 times more likely than non-listeners to approve of family planning.
• Listeners were 1.8 times more likely than non-listeners to say they “currently use something to delay or avoid pregnancy.”
• Listeners were 1.5 times more likely than non-listeners to have ever used a contraceptive method.
• Listeners were 2.1 times more likely than non-listeners to say that the health of the mother is the reason they approve of contraception.
• Listeners were 2.1 times more likely than non-listeners to discuss spacing of births with their spouse or partner in the last twelve months.
• Listeners were 1.5 times more likely than non-listeners to say they intend to use a method of contraception in the future.
• Listeners were 1.8 times more likely than non-listeners to say they favor gender equity.

HIV/AIDS

• Listeners were 1.8 times more likely than non-listeners to know of the fatal nature of HIV/AIDS.
• Listeners were 2.4 times more likely than non-listeners to approve of the use of a condom.
• Listeners were 1.7 times more likely than non-listeners to say that they plan on using a condom in the future.
• Listeners were 2.4 times more likely than non-listeners to say that they approve of using condoms as a means to prevent AIDS.
• Listeners were 1.8 times more likely than non-listeners to have discussed HIV with someone in the last 12 months.

Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (Over 92 percent of women and girls have been circumcised in Mali, one of the highest rates in the world)

• When asked if they would circumcise their daughters frequent listeners (17%) to the program were more likely to say “no” than were non-listeners (12%).
• Males who were frequent listeners (16%) were twice as likely to agree that “female circumcision is dangerous for the health of the girl/woman” than male non-listeners (8%).
• Males who were frequent listeners (13%) were more likely than male non-listeners (8%) to agree that “the practice of female circumcision should be abandoned.”
• Males who were frequent listeners to the program (22%) were more likely to say they would “marry a non-circumcised woman” than male non-listeners (13%).

3.3X

Listeners were 3.3 times more likely than non-listeners to have spoken with someone they know about rights of people with disabilities.

(Endline Research)

2.6X

Listeners were 2.6 times more likely than non-listeners to report knowing at least two modern methods of contraception.

(Endline Research)

2.4X

Listeners were 2.4 times more likely than non-listeners to approve of the use of a condom.

(Endline Research)

Project Information

Title: Jigi ma Tignè (“Hope Is Allowed”)
Format: Radio Serial Drama
Location: Mali
Language: Bambara
Duration: 23 March 2009 – 28 September 2009

PMC Country Administrative Team:
Country Representative: Almoukoutarh Haidara
Finance Assistant: Koman Keita
Administrative Assistant: Fatime Traoré
Drivers: Aliou Konaté

PMC Country Creative Team:
Producer: Ousmane Sow
Studio Technician & Logistics Coordinator: Elbechir Cissé
Writers: Fily Traoré, Karim Diarra

News Related to this Project:


Stopping Stigma, Improving Lives

June 14, 2014 — When Ténimba was 18 months old, she was afflicted by polio, which left her paralyzed. By the age... Keep reading.


Storylines


Dado's Story

At the age of three, Dado developed a high fever and symptoms of polio (against which she was never vaccinated), which left her physically disabled. Her father, convinced that her handicap would bring the family bad luck, chased Dado and her mother away from their home in the village of Tonobougou. They moved to the city Heredougou to live with her mother’s brother. Dado continues to face difficulty and is forced to drop out of school early because of her disability. Not attending school, her cousin Paul (see HIV storyline) leads Dado into a life of drug and alcohol abuse. Mr. Kandé, Paul’s boss and idol, exploits Dado, who is very pretty. He gets her pregnant and then leaves her to deal with the pregnancy by herself. At this low moment in her short life, Dado meets Niagalé, who tells her about the organization Trickle Up that can help Dado develop a small business to earn money to support herself and the baby. Niagalé also introduces Dado to a nice barman, who falls in love with Dado and accepts her child as his own. They eventually get married. In a twist at the end of the story, Dado finds herself helping her father who has become paralyzed.

Issues this storyline addresses:

Guedjouma’s Story

Guedjouma is a 40-year-old peasant farmer who has two wives. He has four children with his first wife and three children with his second wife and has no interest in family planning. His second wife is pregnant with their fourth child, but it is a hard pregnancy. She goes into labor and experiences acute hemorrhaging. Both she and the baby die. Guedjouma is left penniless from the exorbitant medical expenses accrued trying to save his wife and child. This suffering, combined with the sage advice of his first wife, makes Guedjouma realize the importance of family planning. He and his first wife adopt a modern method of contraception. When it is proposed that he marry the young sister of his second wife to allay his grief, he refuses for social and economic reasons. He has learned about the benefits of a small family. Guedjouma begins work at a health association and gets more involved in community and social affairs. He helps to advise others on the benefits of family planning.

Issues this storyline addresses:

Paul's Story

Paul is 18 years old and originally from the village of Tonobougou. He comes from a poor family, but he has the chance to study at a secondary school in town. He is an attractive young man and many women try to seduce him. He is intelligent and ambitious. He works part-time for his idol, Mr. Kandé, a rich businessman who beds every woman he can. Paul dreams of becoming just like Mr. Kandé. Paul allows himself to be seduced by an older woman. He begins to develop symptoms of a sexually transmitted infection, which he fears might be HIV, but he is terrified of taking an HIV test. He begins to use drugs, abuse alcohol, and chase girls at his whim. Finally, at the advice of a female friend, he gets an HIV test – which is negative! However, getting tested scares him so much that he rejects his former risky behaviors, and settles down with the young woman who has literally saved his life. He becomes a peer educator and advises other youth on healthy sexual behavior.

Issues this storyline addresses:

Baro's Story

Baro is a 55-year-old woman who is quite respected. She is a traditionalist and circumcises the girls in her community (a practice known as female genital mutilation/cutting). She has two sons and one daughter. She circumcised her own daughter when the girl was just an infant. Baro suffers from poor health, so she leaves her village to live in the city with her children. Baro’s work circumcising girls displeases her son, Demba, who is against the practice. One day, while Demba is away at work, she circumcises Demba’s youngest daughter, her favorite grandchild who carries Baro’s name. As a result of the circumcision, the girl hemorrhages and dies. Baro is blind with grief; she almost loses her will to live. But with Demba’s support and love, she is renewed – and pledges her life to combating female circumcision in memory of her young granddaughter.

Issues this storyline addresses:

This project funded by

Current World Population

7,649,804,255

Net Growth During Your Visit

0

DonateNow
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

No thanks, close window